Household

In this post I will be showing you how to replace electrical outlets.  Surprisingly enough, this project doesn’t require a lot of tools and is fairly simple.  The first thing you need to do is to turn off the breaker. Then unscrew the outlet from the wall. is to pull the outlet out of the wall as far as possible. Preferably, the wires should be straight.  In my case, my outlets had holes that I plugged the wires into.  Simply put the wires in the same way they came out.  All you have to do now is to unscrew the green screw and twist your ground wire around it then tighten it.  Now put the outlet back in the wall and tighten the screws.

 

 

//Ewinslow

In a singlewide trailer (read: No accessible attic and rafters only every 3-4 feet).

I cut a hole where I wanted the fan, which is fortunately right next to one of the rafters.

I cut a hole where I wanted the fan, which is fortunately right next to one of the rafters.

The first hole ended up not being big enough.  See in this photo the 1x4 that has been screwed to the rafter.

The first hole ended up not being big enough. See in this photo the 1×4 that has been screwed to the rafter.

I kept screwing 1x4s to the one attached to the rafter until the end result was this.

I kept screwing 1x4s to the one attached to the rafter until the end result was this.

That gave me something solid to attach the fan box to:

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Now all the drywall is put back up, the only repairs left are to fill the gaps with drywall compound and then respray the ceiling texture to match before installing the fan.

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Here are some pictures of the finished stand up desk, including a working keyboard tray:

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We’ve mostly finished the cleaning up, and have moved onto organizing things and making repairs/improvements as necessary.  I’m also taking pictures/video as I go to eventually replace the video posted on our home page.

Here’s an update as to some of the things I’ve been doing, but that I don’t have enough pictures of for individual posts:

Built a 445MHz Slim-Jim to use for a repeater

Built a 445MHz Slim-Jim to use for a repeater

Built a PVC tower standoff (which I ended up not needing, but I'll keep it around for future use)

Built a PVC tower standoff (which I ended up not needing, but I’ll keep it around for future use)

Installed a 2m radio in the "new" 1994 Marquis

Installed a 2m radio in the “new” 1994 Marquis

Replacing the upper ball joints on aforementioned 1994 Grand Marquis.

Replacing the upper ball joints on aforementioned 1994 Grand Marquis.

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At the same time the upper ball joints were replaced, I also replaced the lower ball joints, outer tie rod ends, idler arm, stabilizer bar links, and one stabilizer bar bushing.  I had almost every automotive tool we own out before this was all said and done.

This is what it looks like when I work on a car...

This is what it looks like when I work on a car…

Also picked up this mobile darkroom.  More at a later date on this.

Also picked up this mobile darkroom. More at a later date on this.

Here are some pictures of Scott’s new fully-adjustable computer desk, suitable for both sitting in a chair or standing in front of.

 

The frame

The frame

Heavy-duty drawer slides hold the sliding carriage that supports everything.

Heavy-duty drawer slides hold the sliding carriage that supports everything.

The back

The back

The monitor shelf mounted

The monitor shelf mounted

Keyboard and monitor shelves both mounted

Keyboard and monitor shelves both mounted

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Every now and then, we have to put most projects on hold for a few days in order to clean and reorganize areas that have been neglected.  This tends to happen mostly in the winter, because everyone limits the amount of time spent outside working on such things.

Needless to say, that’s the biggest thing I’ve been working on recently, so here are a few pictures of the current progress.

The workshop

The workshop

It's getting there...

It’s getting there…

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Indoor work space

Indoor work space

The media lab

The media lab

The lounge

The lounge

We’re making progress.  More to come later.

Here is a picture of a ceramic tile heat shield I installed behind a woodstove.  It’s not done in this picture, but I took it because it shows every stage of the job.  The drywall was cut out where the tile was going to go, a backer board was installed in the hole, and then the tiles were attached to the backer board.  The only thing not done here (aside from the obvious) is the grout, which is the easiest part.

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During another washer repair, I accidentally cracked the plastic tub surround (AKA the outer tub). The outer tub is fairly easy to break if you have it out, as it is made of pretty thin and brittle plastic.  After searching the internet for hours, I found essentially no useful information on how to fix it, accept to replace the entire tub surround. (About $100, which many washers aren’t worth). I decided to try PVC pipe cement, as it is designed to bond with a very similar material, and is waterproof.

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Below is a picture of my patch. The purple is the PVC primer, while the clear is cement. It may work fine without the primer, however since bonding tightly was the primary tossup, I applied plenty of primer. Many things could have held water in theory, but most of my other ideas would have had bonding difficulties

 

 

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As to the original repair, it went well too, but I did not have enough pictures to make a useful post of it.                                                                                                      The tub patch holds water perfectly. There doesn’t appear to be any pressure on the outer tub, so It should be a long term fix.

I like having our laundry room plumbing out in the open versus hidden inside the walls.  That makes things like this easy.  We picked up a second washing machine and wanted to hook it up right next to the first.  Here’s the new drain I built, which just slips onto the existing drain pipe and allows both to drain through the same one:

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That drain is very similar to one that would be used in a double sink, but bigger.

We just used a couple cheap hose splitters to connect the water supply.  You can’t get a hose splitter rated for hot water that I know of, but I’ve never had a problem with one as long as it’s metal.  The plastic ones don’t last. I also don’t know that I’d drink out of them, but that’s still up for debate and not really an issue here.  I wouldn’t drink out of the clothes washer anyway.

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