Home improvement

In this post I will be showing you how to replace electrical outlets.  Surprisingly enough, this project doesn’t require a lot of tools and is fairly simple.  The first thing you need to do is to turn off the breaker. Then unscrew the outlet from the wall. is to pull the outlet out of the wall as far as possible. Preferably, the wires should be straight.  In my case, my outlets had holes that I plugged the wires into.  Simply put the wires in the same way they came out.  All you have to do now is to unscrew the green screw and twist your ground wire around it then tighten it.  Now put the outlet back in the wall and tighten the screws.

 

 

//Ewinslow

In a singlewide trailer (read: No accessible attic and rafters only every 3-4 feet).

I cut a hole where I wanted the fan, which is fortunately right next to one of the rafters.

I cut a hole where I wanted the fan, which is fortunately right next to one of the rafters.

The first hole ended up not being big enough.  See in this photo the 1x4 that has been screwed to the rafter.

The first hole ended up not being big enough. See in this photo the 1×4 that has been screwed to the rafter.

I kept screwing 1x4s to the one attached to the rafter until the end result was this.

I kept screwing 1x4s to the one attached to the rafter until the end result was this.

That gave me something solid to attach the fan box to:

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Now all the drywall is put back up, the only repairs left are to fill the gaps with drywall compound and then respray the ceiling texture to match before installing the fan.

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Here is a picture of a ceramic tile heat shield I installed behind a woodstove.  It’s not done in this picture, but I took it because it shows every stage of the job.  The drywall was cut out where the tile was going to go, a backer board was installed in the hole, and then the tiles were attached to the backer board.  The only thing not done here (aside from the obvious) is the grout, which is the easiest part.

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Throughout the long course of my drywall repair project I have certainly learned to only use metal putty knives to apply mud. A wider blade is better, not to mention the fact that the whole thing seems to go better for different reasons such as better spreading and etc. That said the metal knives all seem to rust quickly.

I have began resurfacing my most often used knives with a crystal clear enamel coat in a rattle can. This seems to be keeping the rust away, at least for some time.

QUALITY CONTROL NOTE

Make sure the coating goes on smoothly. Drips or bumps will show up in your mud, no matter how small.

 

Due to the fact that I regularly scrape dried mud off of my knives, the enamel coat is not permanent. Below is a picture of one that had endured 2/3 months of use and abuse. The majority of that time was sitting with mud on it and then being scraped to use after a few days, whereas being used every day and kept clean would be better for it. Anyway, if I can sand off the old coat and redo it once in awhile, it is worth it to keep rust and mud from mixing.

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